My Detroit themed stickers making an appearance in the New York Times.

I have been working up a new series of Detroit themed cards and the like, and just the other day my gallery agent made me aware of my Detroit stickers having appeared in a photo from a New York Times article from a couple of days back about Detroit. I am in the process of hand printing another run of these, as well as add new designs to the overall mix. I will be working with my partners at Detroit Wood Type Co. in producing these new cards and other stationary.

Lovely decorations for a laptop. Love seeing how people use these things.  Photo- Fabrizio Constantini for the New York Times.

Lovely decorations for a laptop. Love seeing how people use these things.  Photo- Fabrizio Constantini for the New York Times.

The newest addition just carved and soon to be added to Detroit Wood Type Co.'s new line of stationary.

The newest addition just carved and soon to be added to Detroit Wood Type Co.'s new line of stationary.

I normally have been carving my typographical treatments and illustrations into linoleum up until most recently. I found that it is a very durable and inexpensive medium to work in, but the one drawback is that I don’t see it as a desirable artifact ultimately. This has led me to start carving my work into both end grain and long grain maple and cherry wood. It is a bit more difficult to carve, but I feel more confident that the end result will be a lot more archival. However one drawback to carving and engraving into wood is the potential for repetitive stress injury on my hands and wrists. It makes it so that simple things like typing this entry very miserable, but I have been working on pacing myself a bit better than in the recent past, and I am incorporating routine stretches while I work. In any case, I have found a medium that I truly enjoy exploring, and want to continue exploring in spite of the concerns that I may have for injuring my hands and wrists any further.

Carving in linoleum and wood teaches you so much on the level of muscle memory. I have heated up my linoleum in the past, but I find for myself that I tend to overdo it with carving too deep or carving too much away when I am trying to work out intricate areas of the carving. It isn’t as easy, but I don’t heat up my linoleum anymore because I feel it has taught me how much and how little pressure I need to have while carving with my tools. I feel that the experience carving with resistance has made it easier for me to better understand how to control my carving, and this has assisted me in speeding up my process.